The Serpentine Sorting System

Oh? Are you looking for something? That's okay. Many people are. Do you know what you're looking for? No? Well, that's a problem, but not one we can't solve. Let me direct you to…

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The Library has a lot of books in it. More books than anyone could read in a thousand human lifetimes. More titles than anyone could read in a thousand human lifetimes. And unfortunately, most of its inhabitants do not have that long to spend browsing the shelves. The docents help, but their numbers are limited and sometimes dealing with them can be… unnerving. A long time ago a group of Wanderers banded together and decided to do some categorizing of their own: The Serpent Sorting System, also known as the SSS, the Three Serpents, or just the Serpents. Basing it off many other library sorting schemes found throughout the multi-universe, they created a malleable, constantly updating system for categorizing books by content and genres. They encouraged others to add new books they found to the catalogs, and it quickly spread throughout the culture of the Library. Since then it's grown into a massive, unwieldy, difficult to navigate behemoth, but any Wanderer worth their card knows how to "talk to the Serpents" with ease. And hey, it's still easier than hoping you stumble across what you're looking for on the shelves.

That's some neat lore and all, but what do I, a user of the website, actually do?

It's very simple. Think of the SSS as an expanded prompt system. At any one time, there will be three prompts up. These will be broad categories, or Reference Series, describing a thing, idea, or topic that a group of books might be categorized under. Each Series will have five blank slots on it1. If you think of a story to write following that theme, you can post it, and edit the title into a blank slot under the proper Series. Once the Series is full, it will be be put into the archived Series bin, and staff will add a new one to take its place. Once a series is full, it's full, and no more entries can be put under it. In other words, if you're interested in adding to a Series, you'll need to act somewhat fast (though of course, nothing is stopping you from posting a piece intended for a Series as a regularly story, and please don't let this impact the quality of your writing). Note that each Series has a few sample titles under it. You're allowed to use these as the basis for a story, though of course, you're also allowed and encouraged to make up one of your own.

To add a story, first post it to the main site. Then, replace the "Uncategorized Entry" text with a link to the story and a link to the user page. The format you should use is

[[example story title]] by [*user username]

Do not add drafts, unfinished works, or links to works that are not yet written to this page. You may not reserve slots or insert a work until it has been COMPLETELY written and posted. You are, of course, allowed to edit works after posting, but the initial entry should be a finished product.

So without further ado, the current three Series are…

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Look up when it's dark. Maybe you see stars. Maybe there's a moon, or moons. Maybe there's nothing but a haze of air pollution. The night sky has inspired many writings—Corrin Wayne's romantic poetry to his dead lover, Miyam-Moro's Guide for Aspiring Star Hunters, the Anonymous Prison Window Diaries. What else can you find in this starry collection?

TNS-1: [Uncategorized Entry]
TNS-2: [Uncategorized Entry]
TNS-3: [Uncategorized Entry]
TNS-4: [Uncategorized Entry]
TNS-5: [Uncategorized Entry]


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Do you sit inside when it rains? Or do you venture out into the storm, looking to explore this watery world? Rain is a common theme in works such The Sicilian Counsel's Weather Warnings, Samuel Grey's The Last Hurricane, and ancient myths of Lynean River Guides. What else can you find in this misty collection?

RND-1: [Uncategorized Entry]
RND-2: [Uncategorized Entry]
RND-3: [Uncategorized Entry]
RND-4: [Uncategorized Entry]
RND-5: [Uncategorized Entry]


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Money makes the world go round, baby. People work for it, people lie for it, people kill for it, and plenty of people have written about it, including the essay collection Banker's Exposes, the crime fiction of Sestin Sestin Noweys, and Nobuhiro Muto's One Hundred Million Yen Blues. What else can you find in this expensive collection?

CHC-1: [Uncategorized Entry]
CHC-2: [Uncategorized Entry]
CHC-3: [Uncategorized Entry]
CHC-4: [Uncategorized Entry]
CHC-5: [Uncategorized Entry]

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