The Citykeepers Collection: Tombstone Gardening.
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Introduction
by Edward. P. Taff

Tombstone Gardening and Cultivation may seem an easy task, however despite the fact that your planted tombstone will sprout overnight. The keeping and eventual cultivation of your tombstone and its resultant properties will take time and effort to yield quality produce.

The origins of the practice began countless years ago in the North, where young Cities grew in the desolated countryside. As mass graves covered the majority of the land, early Citykind and their kin began to use the sites as a space for their arts. Summoning the vast sources of extinguished life and energies to aid in their ventures. However, this of course, led to the gravesites becoming as dead and useless as their many occupants, more so as the overzealous or greedy died misusing the sites.

As markers and cemeteries became more prominent, Citykind began to see fit that care was taken in their keeping. The use of stone providing more preservation on the contents and allowing use over many years, long after the original choice of marker, wood, has rotted and died. The chapters on Planting and Caring will explain this in further detail.

Tombstone Gardening is as much an art as a means to an end. While the idea may be out of fashion to contemporary Citykind, some maintain it is a valuable resource in keeping everything from memories to precious and personal artefacts safe.

This guide in the Citykeepers Collection will show you how to properly plant and look after a happy healthy tombstone. To know what the different cracks may mean and how to care for it in all conditions, whether rain, snow or shine. If you follow the instructions contained within correctly, you may be lucky enough to gain more than an overnight stump and be the proud owner of an impeccable stone angel. The use of naming and the importance of choosing the right epitaph on your tombstone is also crucial to its overall ambience. A well named and cared-for tombstone will reflect itself in its plot and surroundings, while a poorly maintained one will crumble and die.

The aim of this little book is to teach you, the gardener, that Tombstone Gardening is more than simply caring for a name on a slab1. It is caring for the land it grows in and the life around it.

So get your gloves ready, prepare your Grave Bulbs and please read the following carefully. Your life may depend on it.


CONTENTS

Introduction ………………………………………………………….001

Choosing A Plot ………………………………………………………002

Planting and Overnight Sprouting ………………………………….012

Choosing Your Words Carefully ……………………………………..034

Once your tombstone has sprouted, you'll notice that it is completely blank. At this point you should begin to inscribe your tombstone's name and epitaph. The epitaph of a tombstone is essential for it to maintain its purpose and not just become a decorative addition to the cemetery it inhabits…

Maintaining Your Tombstone ………………………………………..066

Weather And Its Effects…………………………………………….124

Growth: From Markers To Mausoleums …………………………….187

…drew Cartland once stated, "You can always tell a when a tombstone has grown. The normal grave starts to move away from it." The indicators that your tombstone is about to expand are all to do with the plot it grows in…

Cultivation …………………………………………………………….201

Further Reading ………………………………………………………212

…eepers Collection: Advanced Tombstone Gardening. - E.P. Taff; Crypt Weed Overgrowth, Graveyard Poisoning And Other Hazards. - Jack Faltringham; I Grew The Dead, A Journal. -…

Glossary ……………………………………………………………….214

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